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Your search for Primary care returned 16 results.


Exclusive Hepatitis C Interview: Daryl Luster

So my first question is, can you please tell me a little bit about yourself? DARYL LUSTER: Oh, gosh, what’s to tell? I’m 61 this month. Regarding my background, if somebody had said to me 10, even 15 years ago, that I would be involved in health advocacy, I would have said, huh?  No. Really? So it’s been a real shift for me. I come from a business ...

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Exclusive HCV Interview: Lucinda K Porter, RN

Please tell me a little bit about yourself. LUCINDA: I was a patient who was infected with hepatitis C in 1988, and I turned that into an opportunity to learn more about hepatitis C. I have been working in this field since 1997. Along the way, I worked at Stanford Medical Center in their Hepatology Division. I’ve also done a lot of writing since the late ’90s, ...

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Decentralized HCV Treatment is Effective!

Given the safety, tolerability, simplicity, and efficacy of hepatitis C direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens, decentralizing treatment from gastroenterologists and hepatologists to other specialists, community-based primary care physicians, or appropriately supervised mid-level providers (ie, task-shifting) may be an effective strategy to increase treatment rates, ...

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Real-world impact of sofosbuvir HCV regimens

New study addresses the real-world effectiveness of sofosbuvir (SOF)-based anti-HCV regimens in a diverse patient population consisting of difficult to treat patients. More than a quarter of the assessed US Veterans Affairs (VA) population with chronic HCV infection were African American, almost 90% were over the age of 55, over a third were overweight, and substan...

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Interventions in the HCV care continuum

New systematic review in the journal International Journal of Drug Policy discusses published evidence-based interventions to enhance assessment, treatment, and adherence in the chronic Hepatitis C care continuum. Authors note that primary care settings represent key opportunities for HCV care linkage interventions, often within clinics that have prolonged engagement ...

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Coffee Decreases HCV Advanced Fibrosis Risk

New study indicates that an average daily intake of an estimated 100 mg of caffeine from coffee, tea, or soda is associated with an approximately one-third reduction in odds of advanced fibrosis, although higher intake does not seem to confer any additional benefit. Interestingly, tea intake in those who do not consume coffee may also be associated with a decrea...

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Beneficial Effect of Statins on HCV Infection

In a large, national cohort study assessing the impact of statin use upon progression of fibrosis in an unselected group of patients with various stages and genotypes of HCV, controlling for known confounders, statin use was significantly associated with decreased progression of fibrosis independent of having attained an SVR. This is the first study to demonstrate ...

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Special Interview on HCV: Dr. S. Wiktor of WHO

Thank you for agreeing to participate in this special interview on HCV. What do you see as the biggest global challenges in the diagnosis, screening, and treatment of hepatitis C? Dr. Wiktor: The landscape is changing very quickly and it is being driven by remarkable progress in the development of direct-acting antiviral therapies for hepatitis C. We hear ...

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Focus on Hepatitis B and C risk based screening

Real-life clinical relevance of hepatitis screening in Germany: enhancing risk based screening strategies in primary care settings Effective screening programs are needed to identify HBsAg and anti-HCV positive patients. Population based anti-HCV screening of all adults born between 1945 and 1965 is recommended in the US. For hepatitis B, US-guidelines recommend ...

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Real-life HCV management in US urban center

Study provides a “real-life” snapshot of how HCV infection is being addressed in a major US urban center Acute hepatitis C infection is asymptomatic in 60-70% of individuals. Many people only learn that they are HCV-positive decades later, after their disease has progressed to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver failure. Unfortunately, 50-75% of ...

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